Pages

Friday, April 30, 2010

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

LB Talks the 'Paris Experience' with Karen Ter Morshuizen (Lunar) and Malcolm Kluk (KLuK CGDT)







Karen Talks the 'Paris Experience'







The Paris Collections:




LB: You took part in an exhibition done in conjunction with the Federation Francaise de la Couture’s the Ready to Wear Winter 2010 in Paris – what was required from you?



KM: I had to put together 5 looks for a static exhibition that formed part of a presentation aimed to introduce African designers to the European industry.





LB: The media release, put out by Arise Africa mentioned that one designer will be selected to show at The Spring/Summer 2011 Collections – Should you be selected how will this influence the rest of your career?




KM: In all honesty I don’t know. I am not ready to put on an individual show in Paris just yet. There is too much that has to go into it to just think you can go there and show. You need the right PR, the right press agent, a showroom venue etc, etc, etc.







LB: How has the Paris experience benefited your business?




KM: Every experience that I can gain in learning more about the world industry of fashion can only benefit my business. It makes me wiser and a little bit smarter every time.







LB: What was the most exciting thing about being part of this PR exercise for Arise?




KM: That’s a very interesting way to put the question! Most exciting? Knowing I was going back to Paris and knowing that I was responsible for making my own magic.







LB: What was the most frustrating experience you had while being in Paris?




KM: I chose to not let anything frustrate me, you make of a situation whatever you want and I was very happy to just be there.







LB: What advice would you give to other local designers who want to go overseas and show at international fashion weeks?




KM: Be realistic. You are not going to be an overnight success and nobody cares that you come from South Africa or anywhere else for that matter. Do it for the right reasons and make sure you don’t mess it up.







LB: In your opinion are the SA designers ready to export?




KM: Most no but a handful yes!







At home:








LB: How long have you been designing under the Lunar label?




KM: 15 years







LB: You are one of the few SA designers that have a very successful business in Johannesburg and Cape Town – this obviously takes a lot of experience, business knowledge and passion – what is your advice to designers that want to open their own store?




KM: Opening my first store was the best thing I ever did, but I did it after 10 years of finding my feet with Lunar. I tried bridal, I tried wholesale, I tried consignment, I tried corporate, I tried kids, I even tried sportswear: By the time I went into retail I had a lot of experience and even so I had to learn many lessons along the way and I continue to learn all the time. If designers want to open a store because they think it will solve all their problems they have another thing coming. It doesn’t matter what aspect of the industry you engage in every single one requires hard work and a burning passion.







LB: What do you hate about the fashion industry?




KM: It’s artificial, there is a pretence of glamour.







LB: What do you love about the fashion industry?




KM: Its passion, its intensity, its constant evolution.







LB: Where do you see your business in 5 years?




KM: Lunar will go global. It won’t be the biggest or the greatest brand ever but it will be small, intimate, have integrity and inspire the people that buy it.







LB: How has showing your Collection at SAFW benefitted your business?




KM: SAFW has been very good for us. We have always showed with a specific goal in mind and most times we have achieved what we set out to do. Many of the opportunities that have been presented to us have in some way or another stemmed from being part of SAFW.








Malcolm Talks the 'Paris Experience'




The Paris Collections:






LB: You took part in an exhibition done in conjunction with the Federation Francaise de la Couture’s the Ready to Wear Winter 2010 in Paris – what was required from you?




MK: We were asked to create 5 looks that represented our brand for the A/W 2010 Season RTW as a showcase to gauge response from the media in Paris with the possibility of showing a full show in the future.







LB: The media release, put out by Arise Africa mentioned that one designer will be selected to show at the Spring/Summer 2011 Collections – Should you be selected how will this influence the rest of your career?




MK: I do not think that the French or for that matter the rest of the world are waiting for another designer wherever they may be from. The importance is to look after your customers at home first. There is a difference between showing in Paris which is good for the ego to be accepted on that level, it is good for the business over here as customers recognise that the brand has international relevance and becomes more desirable over here. But, showing in Paris with the intention of selling internationally would mean setting up an office over there to look after press and sales. It would mean focusing wholly on the French industry and answering their needs over local needs.







LB: How has the Paris experience benefited your business?




MK: It was interesting to see that your competition is Chanel, Dior etc - no excuses that we are from Africa and cannot afford what they can. The buyers want the best product that they can sell and the customers want the best quality and style. The exposure to our industry on this level is invaluable to better what we do over here.







LB: What was the most exciting thing about being part of this PR exercise for Arise?




MK: Paris is the first prize in fashion, to be exposed to the best of our industry is amazing.




LB: What was the most frustrating experience you had while being in Paris?




MK: I wish we could have had more press exposure.







LB: What advice would you give to other local designers who want to go overseas and show at international fashion weeks?




MK: Look after your local customers first there is no pot of gold at the end of any rainbow. Be successful here first and then everything else is an added bonus.







LB: In your opinion are the SA designers ready to export?




MK: Quality and consistency is a factor. Few can deliver the quality that the Europeans require. They are also a bit snobbish and prefer clothes to be made in Europe. It would be better for SA designers to set up office over there and perhaps after a few years they will be accepted. Without the support of backing like LVMH, Gucci group etc, it is difficult to compete.







LB: What is the biggest challenge the SA designers have?




MK: We have to make a rand equal a dollar, we have no support from backers and bankers, our customers think that everything from overseas is better and there is little discernment between quality and price.







At home:







LB: How long have you been designing under the Malcolm Kluk label?




MK: This will be 10 years.







LB: You are one of the few SA designers that have a very successful business in Johannesburg and Cape Town – this obviously takes a lot of experience, business knowledge and passion – what is your advice to designers that want to open their own store?




MK: I made the mistake thinking “wouldn’t it be lovely to open a store” and found that it was really hard work and distracting from making clothes. You have to be very people oriented and also have staying power. I couldn’t understand when I started why people would buy anywhere else, but you need to build a trust with customers and that takes time.







LB: How did your partnership with CGDT influence your business?




MK: Apart from sharing the workload, Christiaan is very detail oriented, where I look more holistically. He has a great instinct and is a nicer person.







LB: What do you hate about the fashion industry?




MK: There is no logic or system, it is about emotion and feeling and this makes it difficult to be business minded. Also in SA we have been corrupted by politics and tend to glorify those that aren’t schooled for their creativity when they should be learning to survive.







LB: What do you love about the fashion industry?




MK: I have experienced life that I would never have in another industry. I have been challenged like no other and rewarded for it.







LB: Where do you see your business in 5 years?

MK: That is the fashion industry; you can never tell what may happen.








DMClassics - SS 2010

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Friday, April 16, 2010

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Monday, April 12, 2010

Amanda Laird Cherry - SS 2010


Photographs by Ivan Naude

Thursday, April 1, 2010

SAFW in WWD - article by Bambina Wise


WWD, 13-03-2010