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Tuesday, August 10, 2010

“Fashion Week has given my business a push in a positive direction and given me inspiration to continue to be the best designer I can possibly be.”
Tarien Malherbe – Non-European

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Lucilla Booyzen Wins Shoprite Checkers Women of the Year Award

Photograph: Ivan Naude

The title winners of the new Shoprite Checkers Women of the Year Award which searched for exceptional and visionary women achievers, who with determination and foresight are making an impact on the future of fellow South Africans were announced this weekend (Saturday, 24 July 2010) in Johannesburg.

Receiving the Corner Shop to Big Business Makers Award, Ms Booyzen said the Award is an acknowledgement of the impact that SA Fashion Week has had on the SA public at large.

She added: “Our aim is to create awareness in the minds of the SA consumer to the vast creative design resources that are available to them through our emerging design industry and the unlimited opportunities to create thousands of jobs through building SMME’s and luxury brands which is the future of fashion in Africa”.

Ms Booyzen is a stalwart of the South African Fashion Industry and the woman who launched South African Fashion Week (SAFW). It was the first independent showcase for the country’s fashion designers and has contributed substantially to the growth and future of the South African fashion industry locally and abroad.

She has developed a distinctive South African design ethos and culture through SA Fashion Week, which now also incorporates a number of initiatives to encourage skills transfer, foster new partnerships and support empowerment.

The judging panel commented it was a difficult task to choose one winner as all the nominees are formidable and inspiring. “Ms Booyzen however embodied all the aspects of the criteria and has made an indelible mark in her field locally and internationally, not only for herself, but the individuals she has assisted and South Africa at large.”.

Text: Shoprite Checkers Women of the Year Awards. For more information on the awards evening and other winners, please visit:
www.womenoftheyear.co.za

Monday, July 26, 2010

“There is no growth without acknowledgement. SAFW’s concrete foundation has allowed designers to build themselves over the years, refining and redefining their collections over the seasons under the continuous motivation of the architect, Lucilla Booyzen”. - Shaldon Kopman

Thursday, July 22, 2010

67 MINUTES FOR MADIBA


SAFW joined forces with local designers and fashionistas to give their 67 minutes at the Lerato Love home.

Lerato Love Home is based in Malboro Gardens, Johannesburg. The home was opened by Margaret Mokoka to provide care for 90 children who have been abused, abandoned, orphaned or affected by HIV/Aids. She also runs a feeding program that feeds 600 children each day. SAFW invited local designers and fashionistas to give 67 minutes of their time to the Lerato Love Home on Sunday the 18th July. Warm fashion products were donated to the charity along with other useful items such as bedding, duvets, pillows, towels, underwear for children, non perishable foods, clothing, shoes, stationery, toiletries and blankets. SAFW donated fluffy customised blankets to the home.





Photography by Kat Grudko Photography

Monday, July 19, 2010

“I found that the exhibition in September last year was a great success, not only did we have brilliant sales but I also made fantastic contacts. I found three shops to supply in Johannesburg. I got to meet and network with designers, some at the same stage as me and some more established, as well as the media.
I would definitely exhibit again, not only are the extra sales great, but it’s an amazing platform to connect with customers, designers and the media.”- Stephanie Beyers, Silver Spoon Clothing

Monday, July 12, 2010

“I made so many contacts and sales at the last exhibition, I was extremely happy with the outcome and the public’s response to my designs.” – Robyn de Klerk

Monday, June 28, 2010

"Having had the priviledge to take part in both Fashion Week September 2009 and March 2010, I have been given incredible oppurtunities to further my career as a jewellery designer. I have met and built lasting relationships with other designers, and I have been enriched by being exposed to various new concepts and ideas. It is an invaluable experience." - Metaxia Sterianos - Jewellery Designer

Friday, June 25, 2010

“SA Fashion week was well planned and organized; I believe it is a must for every company in the Fashion Industry.” – Anneas Balt - BALT Wholesale

Thursday, June 24, 2010

“Fashion Week has given my business a push in a positive direction and given me inspiration to continue to be the best designer I can possibly be.”
Tarien Malherbe – Non-European

Friday, May 28, 2010

2010 SOCCER WORLD CUP INSPIRED COLLECTIONS

To order, please email: madriaan@soda.co.za


SODA

Designer: Anna-Mari Pretorius


Soccer Dress (excl. rosette): R 450.00



Soccer Jacket: R 950.00 & Stretch Skirt: R 250.00



Lapel Dress (excl. rosette): R 550.00



Drawstring Dress (excl. neckpiece): R 500.00



Windmill Brooch: R 75.00



Rosette: R 175.00



Soccer Ball Rosette: R 135.00



K IS FOR KELLY

Designer: Kelly Fisher


SA Flag Vest Dress: R 375.00



SIES! ISABELLE

Designer: Isabelle Carpenter


Halterneck Dress: R 850.00



SOBER

Designer: Tshepo Mafokwane


Soccer Cheerleader Outfit (excl. shoes): R 950.00



RJKAY CREATIONS

Designers: Paledi Segapo and Reginald Molamu


Gerry Dress: R 3 500.00



Bonang Dress: R 2 800.00



OLÉ LEDIMO FOR LOXION KULCA

Designer: Olé Ledimo


Biker Jacket: R 2 500.00

House of Olé Shirt: R 1 500.00

Zulu Mblaselo Pants (Zulu in my Botsotso Collection): R 1 200.00

Loxion Stars: R 250.00



Cap: R 250.00

Soccer Tee (Nike by Olé Ledimo): R 650.00

Zulu Mblaselo Pants (Zulu in my Botsotso Collection): R 1 200.00

Loxion Stars: R 250.00



EPHYMOL

Designer: Ephraim Molingoana

Soccer Shirt: R 380.00



THUNDERSTORM

Designer: Thabo

Jacket: R 800.00

Shirt: R 450.00

Pants: R 450.00



GUILLOTINE

Designer: Lisa Jaffe

Price on Request



CLIVE RUNDLE

Designer: Clive Rundle


Price on Request


Price on Request










Wednesday, May 26, 2010

SA Fashion Week on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-axAmPNkmE

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Team SA Fashion Week Roots for Bafana Bafana





In the countdown to 2010 kick off, SA Fashion Week United – the models, the designers, the producers, the hair and make-up glamour mechanics – joined local soccer WAGS and celebrities in a fashionable show of support for our boys as they prepare to take on the rest of the world.

The event took place at SA Fashion Week’s home at the Design District in Rosebank at pop-up store, MiBar.

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Monday, May 3, 2010

Friday, April 30, 2010

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

LB Talks the 'Paris Experience' with Karen Ter Morshuizen (Lunar) and Malcolm Kluk (KLuK CGDT)







Karen Talks the 'Paris Experience'







The Paris Collections:




LB: You took part in an exhibition done in conjunction with the Federation Francaise de la Couture’s the Ready to Wear Winter 2010 in Paris – what was required from you?



KM: I had to put together 5 looks for a static exhibition that formed part of a presentation aimed to introduce African designers to the European industry.





LB: The media release, put out by Arise Africa mentioned that one designer will be selected to show at The Spring/Summer 2011 Collections – Should you be selected how will this influence the rest of your career?




KM: In all honesty I don’t know. I am not ready to put on an individual show in Paris just yet. There is too much that has to go into it to just think you can go there and show. You need the right PR, the right press agent, a showroom venue etc, etc, etc.







LB: How has the Paris experience benefited your business?




KM: Every experience that I can gain in learning more about the world industry of fashion can only benefit my business. It makes me wiser and a little bit smarter every time.







LB: What was the most exciting thing about being part of this PR exercise for Arise?




KM: That’s a very interesting way to put the question! Most exciting? Knowing I was going back to Paris and knowing that I was responsible for making my own magic.







LB: What was the most frustrating experience you had while being in Paris?




KM: I chose to not let anything frustrate me, you make of a situation whatever you want and I was very happy to just be there.







LB: What advice would you give to other local designers who want to go overseas and show at international fashion weeks?




KM: Be realistic. You are not going to be an overnight success and nobody cares that you come from South Africa or anywhere else for that matter. Do it for the right reasons and make sure you don’t mess it up.







LB: In your opinion are the SA designers ready to export?




KM: Most no but a handful yes!







At home:








LB: How long have you been designing under the Lunar label?




KM: 15 years







LB: You are one of the few SA designers that have a very successful business in Johannesburg and Cape Town – this obviously takes a lot of experience, business knowledge and passion – what is your advice to designers that want to open their own store?




KM: Opening my first store was the best thing I ever did, but I did it after 10 years of finding my feet with Lunar. I tried bridal, I tried wholesale, I tried consignment, I tried corporate, I tried kids, I even tried sportswear: By the time I went into retail I had a lot of experience and even so I had to learn many lessons along the way and I continue to learn all the time. If designers want to open a store because they think it will solve all their problems they have another thing coming. It doesn’t matter what aspect of the industry you engage in every single one requires hard work and a burning passion.







LB: What do you hate about the fashion industry?




KM: It’s artificial, there is a pretence of glamour.







LB: What do you love about the fashion industry?




KM: Its passion, its intensity, its constant evolution.







LB: Where do you see your business in 5 years?




KM: Lunar will go global. It won’t be the biggest or the greatest brand ever but it will be small, intimate, have integrity and inspire the people that buy it.







LB: How has showing your Collection at SAFW benefitted your business?




KM: SAFW has been very good for us. We have always showed with a specific goal in mind and most times we have achieved what we set out to do. Many of the opportunities that have been presented to us have in some way or another stemmed from being part of SAFW.








Malcolm Talks the 'Paris Experience'




The Paris Collections:






LB: You took part in an exhibition done in conjunction with the Federation Francaise de la Couture’s the Ready to Wear Winter 2010 in Paris – what was required from you?




MK: We were asked to create 5 looks that represented our brand for the A/W 2010 Season RTW as a showcase to gauge response from the media in Paris with the possibility of showing a full show in the future.







LB: The media release, put out by Arise Africa mentioned that one designer will be selected to show at the Spring/Summer 2011 Collections – Should you be selected how will this influence the rest of your career?




MK: I do not think that the French or for that matter the rest of the world are waiting for another designer wherever they may be from. The importance is to look after your customers at home first. There is a difference between showing in Paris which is good for the ego to be accepted on that level, it is good for the business over here as customers recognise that the brand has international relevance and becomes more desirable over here. But, showing in Paris with the intention of selling internationally would mean setting up an office over there to look after press and sales. It would mean focusing wholly on the French industry and answering their needs over local needs.







LB: How has the Paris experience benefited your business?




MK: It was interesting to see that your competition is Chanel, Dior etc - no excuses that we are from Africa and cannot afford what they can. The buyers want the best product that they can sell and the customers want the best quality and style. The exposure to our industry on this level is invaluable to better what we do over here.







LB: What was the most exciting thing about being part of this PR exercise for Arise?




MK: Paris is the first prize in fashion, to be exposed to the best of our industry is amazing.




LB: What was the most frustrating experience you had while being in Paris?




MK: I wish we could have had more press exposure.







LB: What advice would you give to other local designers who want to go overseas and show at international fashion weeks?




MK: Look after your local customers first there is no pot of gold at the end of any rainbow. Be successful here first and then everything else is an added bonus.







LB: In your opinion are the SA designers ready to export?




MK: Quality and consistency is a factor. Few can deliver the quality that the Europeans require. They are also a bit snobbish and prefer clothes to be made in Europe. It would be better for SA designers to set up office over there and perhaps after a few years they will be accepted. Without the support of backing like LVMH, Gucci group etc, it is difficult to compete.







LB: What is the biggest challenge the SA designers have?




MK: We have to make a rand equal a dollar, we have no support from backers and bankers, our customers think that everything from overseas is better and there is little discernment between quality and price.







At home:







LB: How long have you been designing under the Malcolm Kluk label?




MK: This will be 10 years.







LB: You are one of the few SA designers that have a very successful business in Johannesburg and Cape Town – this obviously takes a lot of experience, business knowledge and passion – what is your advice to designers that want to open their own store?




MK: I made the mistake thinking “wouldn’t it be lovely to open a store” and found that it was really hard work and distracting from making clothes. You have to be very people oriented and also have staying power. I couldn’t understand when I started why people would buy anywhere else, but you need to build a trust with customers and that takes time.







LB: How did your partnership with CGDT influence your business?




MK: Apart from sharing the workload, Christiaan is very detail oriented, where I look more holistically. He has a great instinct and is a nicer person.







LB: What do you hate about the fashion industry?




MK: There is no logic or system, it is about emotion and feeling and this makes it difficult to be business minded. Also in SA we have been corrupted by politics and tend to glorify those that aren’t schooled for their creativity when they should be learning to survive.







LB: What do you love about the fashion industry?




MK: I have experienced life that I would never have in another industry. I have been challenged like no other and rewarded for it.







LB: Where do you see your business in 5 years?

MK: That is the fashion industry; you can never tell what may happen.








DMClassics - SS 2010

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Friday, April 16, 2010

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Monday, April 12, 2010

Amanda Laird Cherry - SS 2010


Photographs by Ivan Naude

Thursday, April 1, 2010

SAFW in WWD - article by Bambina Wise


WWD, 13-03-2010

Monday, March 29, 2010

[Epilogue]

To conclude... after 3 ultra awesome days I can truly say that each and every designer tackled and dissected summer in their own way.
From the re-introduction to old colours that were forgotten about,
to the use of different material,
to metaphorical motives,
to Tarantino films,
to building apparatus,
to shear fun,
to spookasem,
to motown,
to historical icons,
to summer nights and summer breezes,

but most of all... to the city Jozi.

It's been an inspirational experience!
Well done to each and every designer!
This is me, Paris B, signing out... back in September...
maybe...hopefully...we'll see :)

Lovage
Paris B

Sunday, March 28, 2010

[Grand Finale]

The last 3 shows of the evening looked at designers DM Classics, Thunderstorm, Darkie, Ephymol and Sylvester Falata. And boy, am I glad I saw these... the ranges were now also focusing on men and their perfect summer range.

DM Classics
Did you ever watch the film Jackie Brown?
You know, that other Tarantino film that didn't get as much spotlight as Pulp Fiction did?
The one with Robert De Niro? Yup. That one.
This range reminded me of that film - really 'cause it screamed attitude and funk.
Designer Dennis Manthata Maponya used brown like you'd never seen it be used.
From light hazelnut ones to that resembling Godiva chocolates
(Hey, no drooling please - it messes up your keyboard)
Men were dressed from head to toe in that which screamed hard-core and professional.
To suit any business (get the pun?)
It brought about this sense of Evening elegance for any night out on the town, the summer air brushing up against his jacket and licking the edges of your evening dress.
With the colours of chocolate milkshakes to classic caramels, Dennis looked at the warm side to summer and the heat in darker, richer, African colours.
AND... he made me smile by reviving the bow-tie
- I honestly think more men should wear them.
From old school biker jackets, to little black dresses, to tuxedos
- it was like James Bond and James Brown were the siblings we never heard about

Above 2 photos: © Planet Ivan - Ivan Naude

Thunderstorm
Bob the builder, can he fix it? Bob the builder, yes he can!
And yes, yes, yes did designer Thabo Maserumule amaze us with his builder's wear inspired range. Everything down to the last detail was thought out. Every single model had something to do with building apparatus. One would walk in with a hammer in hand, the other with a bag filled with sandwiches and coffee - the worker's lunch.
It was ingenious! Affective, grungy and added to the attitude Thabo wanted to portray.
He brought back the close-to-turquoise blue and clean white.
To me it felt kinda like ice cream soda pop colours with that hard-core builder's cheek intact.
Kinda 70's Motown yet still very modern.
It was interesting that he chose the builder's wear specifically 'cause what I felt that it did, was bring back the question to 'what actually is, a real man?'
The type that builds? Constructs? Changes?
There was this cute...in a sense...hard core image established on the outside, yet with this inner soul on the inside. A real man who loves, cares, nurtures and understands.
It screamed masculinity at every chance it got and experimented with a new concept that succeeded in making us smile, laugh and want the term 'real man' in every context.

Above 2 Photos: © Planet Ivan - Ivan Naude

Darkie
Each year I have the privilege to be blown away by Themba Mngomezulu's work.
And this year proved to be no less.
Darkie combined style and culture this year in a way that old school trends, icons and cultures were revived.
For instance, and thanks to Vincent - who was seated next to me and who I'd just met - the use of the Ndebele culture and art in prints and patterns, revived the culture, which according to Vincent, is slowing dying out and isn't as prominent as it used to be.
This made me smile. Here, you have a designer who isn't just designing clothes, but is multi-taskingly bringing back trends and cultures.
Themba revived the spirit of old historical icons, those who fought for peace and freedom - Malcom X, Martin Luther King Jnr, Gandhi...
all asking the same question repeatedly: Victim, or hero?
It was like a 70's Afro funk revival, so much you'd expect the models to have Afros - but instead screamed attitude and revived a retro Sofia Town.
I then made up the following phrase, Retro African Kitch.
What do you think? I reckon it works :)
There was a revival for this almost golf-like like, the big carrier bags and trippy colours.
It was casual and somewhat Pulp Fiction-y - I dunno, maybe it had something to do with the haunting yet soulful Tom-Watts kind of music.
Full colours to Themba :)

Ephymol
Ephymol designer, Ephraim Molingoana took his inspiration from the streets of Jozi, bringing in waistcoats, linen and earthy shades.
His use of thin and light material portrayed summer's care-free attitude perfectly and breathed as the models moved.
There were moments were old 70's flowers were revived in clothing and this one outfit that reminded me of Scooby Doo - probably 'cause it resembled either character Shaggy or the Van they use to catch monsters in.
- Don't mind me, I love that program.
I must hand it to Ephraim for his impeccable detail and exquisite use of light, wispy fabric.
The dull routine of rolling up a sleeve was now changed into a purposeful move of style. The earthy creams, brown and oranges encompassed summer's warmth and the sands of Africa.
His use of shorts and straw hats made the men look ever-so-cool in light, relaxing clothing.
His range reminded me a lot of that of Paul Smiths - which is a compliment might I add.


Sylvester Falata
Last for the evening and for the event was a range from designer Sylvester Falata.
This range looked at exotic and candy-coated colours that aren't normally used.
This experimentation with colour meant that his range was different, new and completely fresh.
He brought in jumpsuits that stoppped at knee length, in bright exotic colours - cool and easy to wear on a hot day.
Remember how we use to take off our jerseys and tie them around our waists? Yeah, that kinda died in 2002 (well at least for me it did) well, Sylvester brought it back in a way that it was super sexy, attractive and showed summer at every chance it had.
The use of thai silk meant that the clothes were uber comfortable and light for a day out - yet it still portrayed masculinity - don't think it didn't.
There was something interesting he did with the shoulders - you know those pointed flat, outward shoulder guards that the ancient japanese and chinese soldiers had? Yeah it was kinda like that - it brought in a whole new look for the male figure, he looked strong, bold and pretty hard-core I'm not gonna lie.
Buttoned sweaters were used, again to shield those light summer winds and chilly, dew-stained mornings.
And to top it all, was the guest appearance of singer Lira - a beautiful women in a beautiful dress.
Radical :)


Back with epilogue bit later

Lovage
Paris B